Who’s the daddy? Disputed cases of paternity in eighteenth-century Ulster

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences from the earliest times to the present day. This month we have PoP Director Leanne Calvert talking about men and sexuality in the 18th Century.

DNA testing has become the standard method of determining paternity. Daytime television shows, such as ITV’s The Jeremy Kyle Show, regularly include segments that feature disputes and arguments over paternity, usually involving multiple potential fathers. A quick mouth swab, inevitable rows, and a dramatic pause later, the question of ‘Who’s the daddy’ is solved relatively quickly. But how did those in the eighteenth-century determine paternity? In the age before DNA testing (and before daytime television hosts), how did women and men figure out who exactly was the daddy? 

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“so a word to the wise’: reassessing the role of the upper-class Irish father in nineteenth-century childrearing’

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences from the earliest times to the present day. This week Judy Bolger writes about a father´s involvement, through written advice, in the upbringing of his children.

‘So a word to the wise – Your mother says asses’ milk – or Breast milk given on a spoon’ wrote John D’Alton to his wife Catherine in 1819.[1] Though spending much of his family’s early years away from home, John’s surviving letters demonstrate that he was still very much engaged with his children’s feeding habits and their daily lives in Summerville, Dublin during the early nineteenth century.[2] Through these various references about his children, an alternative representation of the father is reconstructed. Much scholarly attention toward the period has reinforced the severity of the public and private divide amongst women and men.[3] However, such a sweeping generalisation about the gender norms of the period may not be as clear-cut as we have understood. In a nuanced manner, these letters not only showcased John’s engagement with his children’s rearing, but also his advice and interest in tasks that have hitherto been deemed outside his gender’s concern. Therefore, the extracts from the letters blur the lines between the traditional roles within the nineteenth-century upper-class Irish family.

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Too many visits to the doctor

The Neue Osnabrücker Zeitung comments on what it considers an excessive amount of doctors visits during pregnancy. It reflects the concern that such a trend will change the perception of pregnancy from something natural and physiological to something of a problem or disease.

http://www.noz.de/deutschland-welt/politik/artikel/600051/schwangere-lassen-sich-zu-oft-untersuchen

This is part of a series of articles published by Neue Osnabrücker Zeitung on the ongoing discussions around the rise in caesarean sections in Germany; highlighting the dominant belief in several sections of society that natural birth is always best and should actively encouraged.

Mothers, Motherhood, and Mothering in Popular Culture

WHO: Southwest Popular/American Culture Association (SWPACA)
WHERE: Albuquerque, New Mexico
WHEN: 10-13 February 2016
DEADLINE: 1 November 2015

Proposals are now being accepted for the conference’s newly established subject area, Mothers, Motherhood, and Mothering in Popular Culture.

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Attachment Theory and Second-Child Parenthood

Submitted by Deborah Rodriguez, Department of Psychology, Middlesex University, London, UK.

Key words: attachment theory, parenthood.

Attachment theory pays particular attention to individual differences and how these can have an impact upon people’s relational style. Typically, a partner or a close friend serves as an attachment figure in adulthood. Broadly, secure adult relationships are characterised by the capacity to relate to others in a mutual and reciprocal manner, and the ability to sustain the continuity of relationships. Insecurely attached adults may be anxious-ambivalent, and this attachment style is characterised by preoccupying thoughts of obtaining and retaining access to their attachment figure, are likely to focus on negative emotions and seek more support than partners are able or willing to provide. Insecurely attached adults may also be anxious-avoidant, and this attachment style is characterised by the suppressing of attachment–related thoughts, and even when stressed, they are likely to use coping strategies that involve distancing rather than seeking support from partners (Lopez and Brennan, 2000).

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